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Winter Beer Definitions

February 24th, 2012 by Android | No Comments | Filed in Uncategorized

Winter Brews

Barleywines

Arguably the First Beer on Steroids, Barley Wines are lively, fruity and contain rocket fuel level’s of alcohol, Barleywines or if you prefer Barley Wines are very flamboyant beers. What do you expect from a beer that calls itself “wine!” Comparable to a work of modern art, they are intense, complex, dark, colorful, and usually created by a person so full of himself it reflexively invokes your discharge gag reflex. Ranging from Amber to dark brown in color, featuring intense flavors determined by the brewmaster’s personal style; they can be lightly or intensely hopped, primarily sweet or bitter-sweet, aromas that attack your olfactory functions with aggressive fruit or hops96 and the mouth feel or viscosity of a 10w-40 grade motor oil. These are not session beers for temperatures above 50 degrees Fahrenheit because they will likely induce alcohol/heat induced spastic stomach convulsions, severe dehydration and death. Drinking barleywines as a session beer at temperatures below 50 degrees s also not strongly recommended as they will likely lead to rapid core body temperature drop, frostbite and death. In short these beers not suited to being session beers under any circumstances, and generally not suited to anybody’s taste except the most extreme beer drinker or someone who wants a guaranteed buzz and malt liquor just ain’t cutting it anymore. Generally top fermented, barley wines can be broken down in to two main categories, British and American, the main differences being American version generally have higher alcohol contents and almost invariably are “insanely hopped . . . typically using American high alpha oil hops.” 97

American Syle:Commercial Examples
Sierra Nevada’s Bigfoot Barleywine Style Ale; Victory’s Old Horizontal; Great Divide’s Old Ruffian Barley Wine; Avery’s Hog Heaven Barley Wine; Rogue’s XS Old Crustacean;
Dogfish Head’s Olde School Barleywine; Hair of the Dog’s Fred; Lagunitas’ Olde GnarlyWine;
Hair of the Dog’s Doggie Claws; Southern Tier’s Backburner (Imperial Barley Wine Style Ale);
Three Floyds’ Behemoth Blonde Barleywine98

English Style:Commercial Examples:
Anchor’s Old Foghorn, Brooklyn’s Monster Ale, Flying Dog’s Horn Dog Barley Wine Style Ale, J.W. Lees Vintage Harvest Ale, Weyerbacher’s Blithering Idiot
Avery’s Samael’s Ale, Clipper City’s Heavy Seas – Below Decks (Barley Wine Style Ale) Duck-Rabbit’s Barleywine Ale, Old Dominion’s Millennium Ale, Arcadia’s Cereal Killer Barley Wine, J.W. Lees Harvest Ale (Lagavulin Whisky Cask), Rock Art’s Ridge Runner, Midnight Sun’s Arctic Devil Barley Wine , Ridgeway’s Criminally Bad Elf, J.W. Lees Harvest Ale (Calvados Cask), Pelican’s The Perfect Storm / The Mother Of All Storms.99

Belgian Strong Ales – This is an all encompassing category of Belgian Ales that include Belgian Blondes, Abbey, Trappist, Dubbels, Trippels, Flemish Reds and Bruin or Brown Ales, both sour and sweet. What unifies the Belgian strong Ales is the amount of alcohol they contain. Also what unifies them is that you must have a high capacity for alcohol absorption to drink them as a session beer. What differentiates them is that even within a given category a Belgian Ale may use Gruit or hops or both as the primary post malt flavor enhancer. Often times a tripel or a dubbel or Abbey Ales. 100

Belgian Blonde or Golden Ale or Strong Pale Ales – Do not let the name fool you. These are strong, generally sweet heavy brews. Look at the names for the commonly associated with these Brews Duvel(Devil), Satan, Lucifer, and Judas or serious alcohol withdrawal symptoms, Delirium Tremens. They tend to seduce you in with a safe sexy style name like Blonde or Golden, the implication being that it drinks like a Pilsener yet instead they are what their brand implies hitting you over the head with high alcohol and often heavy sweetness. They may be spiced with coriander for example Chouffe, and may use dry hopping to add aroma and preservative effects of hops but not add hop bitterness to the beer. Walloon Brewers(the French speaking sections of Belgium like this style and the best known version is the “slightly hazy” Moinette.101

CommercialExamples: Duvel’s Duvel, Huyghe’s Delerium Tremens, Unibroue’s Don de Dieu, North Coast’s Prangster, Russian River’s Damnation, Goose Island’s Matilda, Brooklyn Brewery’s Brooklyn Local 1, Brasserie d’Achouffe’s La Chouffe, Bosteels’ Pauwel Kwak, Dogfish Head’s Pangaea, Avery’s Salvation, Brouwerij De Smedt/Affligem’s Affligem Blond, DeDolle’s De Dolle Stille Nacht, Stone’s 10.10.10 Vertical Epic.102

Flemish Oud Bruin
Being HUGE Boston Hockey fans, tavernator can not ignore this style, even if the Flemish meaning of Oud Bruin is old brown. Typical of a number of Belgian styles, they virtually defy definition because each example, sometimes brewed only a few miles apart,103 can be so different it raises a question as to whether it is a style at all. The only consistencies are the color, Brown, a general lack of hop flavor or aroma and that old and new Oud Bruin brews can be blended for consistency of flavour from year to year. Oud Bruins textures range from light to heavy and flavours range from sweet to sour, sometimes with spicy notes and sometimes a smooth drink. Because of this variability the placement of Oud Bruin in the Winter beer category remains largely arbitrary. It really depends upon which Oud Bruin you pick up.

Commercial Examples:
Van Steenberge’s Monk’s Café Flemish Sour Ale, Bavik’s Petrus Oud Bruin, Liefman’s Goudenband, Bavik’s Petrus Aged Pale, Deschutes’ The Dissident, Ommegang’s Ommegang Zuur, HaandBryggeriet’s Haandbakk, The Bruery’s Collaboration Series: Marrón Acidifié De Struise’s Aardmonnik – Earthmonk Van Honsebrouck’s Bacchus, Captain Lawrence’s Rosso E Marrone, Gulpener’s Mestreechs Aajt, Goose Island’s Madame Rose, Goose Island Beer Co. Kuhnhenn’s Kuhnhenn Cherry Olde Brune, Bockor’s Bellegems Bruin, Riva’s Vondel, De Dolle’s De Dolle Oerbier Special Reserva (by year)2008)104

Tripels

High in alcohol content, generally 8 to 12% Tavernator generally discourages members of the public from quaffing these monsters unless they wish to completely and utterly disregard their waistline and livers. Much like a well made frat house punch the drinker should not taste the alcohol, just sense its presence. The term tripel refers to the use of up to three times the normal amount of malt, the main source of alcohol in beer, than a standard Trappist ale.105 Bright yellow to golden in colour they look a bit like and certainly hit like a Belgian Blonde, the beer style that is. When poured into the proper glassware a big thick creamy head should await the drinker. The most consistent flavor should be sweetness, on the back end at least, stemming from the high alcohol and pale malt content. Other flavours such as spice, fruit/esters may be present depending upon the brewer’s interpretation of this style. These brews prefer bottle conditioning so searching for them on tap will probably prove fruitless.

Commercial Examples:
Unibroue’s La Fin Du Monde, Victory’s Golden Monkey, Chimay’s Chimay Tripel (White), Westmalle Trappist Abbey’s Westmalle Trappist Tripel, St. Bernardus’ St. Bernardus Tripel, Bosteels’ Tripel Karmeliet, Allagash’s Allagash Tripel Ale, New Belgium’s Trippel Belgian Style Ale, Allagash’s Allagash Curieux (Bourbon Barrel-Aged Tripel) Weyerbacher’s Merry Monks’ Ale, Duvel’s Maredsous 10 – Triple, Corsendonk’s Corsendonk Agnus / Abbey Pale Ale, Van Steenberge’s Augustijn Ale, Konigshoeven’s La Trappe Tripel, De Dolle’s De Dolle Dulle Teve (Mad Bitch), Van Steenberge’s Bornem Triple, Het Anker’s Gouden Carolus Tripel, Bell’s Sparkling Ale, Abbey St. Benedictus’ Trappist Achel 8° Blond, Anderson Valley’s Brother David’s Triple Abbey Style Ale.106

Dubbels

No this is not some odd Belgian variation of tennis, but a classic Abbey/Trappist Brown Ale.107 They run in the 6 to 9 % ABV range, although 8% seems like a good number based upon the names of the Belgian ones below, so any way you slice it, they can pack a wallop. They tend to be rich in texture, strong in malt flavour with some hop bitterness, but not of the lingering variety one should find in an IPA or pilsener. Wintery Spice notes are very common. Despite their relatively recent inception, Dubbels taste like they have been made since the middle ages with their heavy maltiness and wintery spice notes, tasting like they might be made with gruit.108These too are mostly bottle conditioned so they are rarely found on tap.

Commercial examples:
Rochefort’s Trappistes Rochefort 8, Ommegang Abbey Ale, Chimay Premiere,(Red Label), Westmalle Trappist Dubbel, St, Bernardus Prior 8, Allagash Dubbel Ale, Trappist Westvleteren 8, Goose Island’s Pere Jacques, New Belgium’s Abbey Belgian Style Ale Duvel’s Maredsous 8 Dubbel, St, Bernardus Pater 6, Corsendonk Pater/Abbey Brown Ale, Coor’s Blue Moon Winter Abbey, Alken-Maes’ Grimbergen Dubbel, Smuttynose Winter Ale, Van Steenberge’s Bornem Dubbel, Koningshoeven’s La Trappe Dubbel, St. Benedictusabdij de Achelse’s Trappist Achel 8° Bruin, Sierra Nevada’s Ovila Abbey Dubbel. The Lost Abbey’s Lost & Found Abbey Ale.109

Porters
Porters encompass essentially eight Tavernator categories of beer: Porter, Baltic Porter, American Porter, Irish Stout, Imperial Stouts International Stouts, and Oatmeal Stouts.110 First developed in the early 1700’s Porter became the first modern beer; a beer capable of being brewed in large, industrial size batches. It was this capacity for large production size that made Porter one of the first Uber Beers since Antiquity. Its range, being attached to the ever expanding British Empire, was world wide and its development adopted in numerous nations. They are placed in Winter beers, because of their strong flavour and texture, even though by most winter beer standards they are quite quaffable, and it is not uncommon to see a person quaffing some version of Porter in the summer. Porter would dominate the beer drinking world for nearly100 years.111

Porter – This is a top-fermented ale produced with a healthy dose of some form of dark roasted malt or less frequently dark roasted barley, and will most likely contain light or brown roasted malt or both as well.112 . Most Porters will have some dark roasted beverage flavour like coffee or smokiness, but the level will vary greatly from brewer to brewer. All should be full bodied and deep amber colour to a near opaque black. Generally moderately hopped, most of their flavour should come from the malt combinations the brewer chooses to use. Common dog whistle flavours will also be dark, like chocolate, caramel, or toffee. These flavours can be enhanced by the actual introduction of coffee, chocolate, etc., which is especially common in American Porters and numerous types of stout. Arguably the term Porter and Stout are redundant, both names deriving from the same original beer style. After all Guinness was Extra Superior Porter before 1840.113
Commercial Examples:
Samuel Smith’s – The Famous Taddy Porter, Fuller’s London Porter, Sam Adams Honey Porter, Harviestoun’s Old Engine Oil, Left Hand’s Black Jack Porter St. Peter’s Old-Style Porter, Meantime’s Coffee Arcadia London Porter Ridgeway’s Santa’s Butt Meantime’s London Porter, Mad Ariver’s Steelhead Scotch Porter, Yards’ General Washington’s Tavern Porter, Nogne O’s Porter, Nogne O’s God Jul, Mayflower Porter, Salopian’s Entire Butt English Porter, Darwin’s Original Flag Porter, Geary’s London Style Porter, Bluegrass’ Dark Star Porter, Nethergate’s Old Growler.114

American Porter – Much like other American style beers, the standard style rules do not apply. During the heyday of the PAP era 1955 to 1970, Yuengling produced one of the only commercially available Porters in America and it was not even a true Porter; Lager fermented and laden with corn adjunct, it was very dark, very smoky and richer than most other American fare of the time. It could have been derived from a variation on a German Dunkel recipe. After Yuengling came Anchor Porter in 1972, top fermented, no adjuncts, but fairly heavily hopped. This left a fairly wide interpretive space for future American brewers to fill with their own Porters. And fill it they did, during the ensuing craft brewing revolution, adding more hops, or highlighting dog whistle flavours by adding chocolate, coffee, vanilla or chipotle peppers to their interpretations.115 In short American Porter is sort of the Extreme Sports of Porters. Almost the dead opposite of traditional American Style brews which try to have their flavours go unnoticed American Porters will give you a strong smack of hops, or a distinct smokiness, chocolate, coffee or vanilla notes that even the tone deaf can hear. They may also be subtle, but like most Americans, they tend to favour direct and clear communication of their attributes.116

Commercial Examples:
Anchor Porter, Yuengling Porter, Butte Creek Organic Porter, Hoppin Frog’s Silk Porter, Ithaca’s Gorges Smoked Porter, Yazoo’s Sue, Magic Hat’s Ravell, Stone’s Smoked Porter With Vanilla Bean, Upland’s Bad Elmer’s Porter, Anderson Valley’s Deep Enders Dark Porter, Elysian’s Perseus Porter, Cisco’s Moor Porter, Utah’s Wasatch Polygamy Porter, Flying Fish Imperial Espresso Porter, Mikkeler’s Texas Ranger (Chipotle Porter), Lion’s Stegmaier Porter, Southampton Imperial Porter, Left Hand’s Fade To Black Volume 3 – Pepper Porter, Tyranena’s Benji’s Chipotle Smoked Imperial Porter, Sweetwater’s Exodus Porter, Short’s Black Cherry Porter, Narragansett’s Porter.117

Baltic Porter – Porter initially brewed for export to the Baltic Sea regions or Porter produced in the nations that ring the Baltic Sea: Denmark, Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Sweden, Russia, Poland and once upon a time East Germany; or some combination of both. Baltic Porters tend to be high in alcohol content, ranging around 7.0% ABV.118 Originally all top fermented, many of the brewers of these Porters, especially those on the continent, switched to Lager fermenting yeast, since they were probably brewing some sort of pilsener style beer, they could save on the yeast costs with the economies of scale. Smoke and bitterness should be notable flavours, with a touch of acid to even it out.119

Commercial Examples:
Flying Dog’s Gonzo Imperial Porter, Sinebrychoff Porter, Baltika #6 Porter, Victory’s Baltic Thunder, Okocim Porter (Okocim is a subsidiary of Carlsberg), Duck-Rabbit Baltic Porter, Smuttynose Baltic Porter (Big Beer Series), Southampton Imperial Baltic Porter, Olfabrikken Porter, Zywiec Porter, (Zywiec is a subsidiary of Heineken), Carlsberg Sweden’s Carnegie Porter, Flyin Dog’s Wild Dog Barrel-Aged Gonzo Imperial Porter, Boss’ Black Boss Porter, Harpoon Leviathan – Baltic Porter, Great Divide’s Smoked Baltic Porter, Ska’s Nefarious Ten Pin Imperial Porter, Surly’s Smoke, Svyturys -Utenos Alus’s Porter, Alaskan’s Baltic Porter, Shipyard’s Imperial Porter.120

Irish, or Dry Stout – The reigning King of Porters, it is, obviously, a style developed in Ireland. Rich in texture, yet light to medium bodied, creamy head, opaque black in colour, it has a surprisingly smooth dry slightly coffee-like flavour. The use of unmalted roasted barley tends to set it apart from other stouts and porters, creating that distinctive smooth, dry coffee-like flavour. Some malty sweetness may be evident. The hops are minimal, leaving no aroma or flavour, but their bitterness blends with the dark malts accentuating its subtle character.

“Commercial examples:
Guinness, Guinness Extra Stout, Sierra Nevada, Murphys Irish Stout, Beamish Stout, Old No 38, Black Hawk Stout, Shef Stout, Rainbow Trout Stout.
O.G.: 1.036 – 1.055; Alcohol: 3 – 6%; IBUs: 25 – 40; SRM: 35 +.” 121

Sweet Stout – Hailing form the English side of the islands (Britain and Ireland), Sweet stout achieves its character with lower total grain than Irish stout. Nonetheless it tends to have an almost heavy chocolate-caramel sweetness with hints of coffee and roast. Light hopping(relative to the style and amount of malt), Chocolate malt, and milk sugar(lactose) creates this oddly balanced dark opaque style of stout. Sometimes referred to as “‘Farm Stout’, ‘Milk Stout’ and ‘Cream Stout’.

Commercial examples:
Mackeson Stout, Sweetheart Stout, Watneys Cream Stout, Samuel Adams Cream Stout.
O.G.: 1.038 – 1.056; Alcohol: 4 – 6%; IBUs: 15 – 25; SRM: 35 +.”122

Oatmeal Stout – Essentially sweet stout with oatmeal added increasing fullness both of body and flavor often describes as smoother, silkier with a touch of nuttiness added to the caramel chocolate coffee roastiness.

“Commercial examples:
Samuel Smiths Oatmeal Stout, Barney Flats Oatmeal Stout, Youngs Oatmeal Stout, Lacto Milk Stout. O.G.: 1.038 – 1.056; Alcohol: 4 – 6%; IBUs: 15 – 25; SRM: 35 +.”123

International Stout – Oddly enough international stouts were often brewed for tropical markets, so they brewed them slightly heavier and stronger than the Irish variation. They can range between stronger versions of a dry stout to something bordering on a sweet stout. They are brewed with more malt and then additional hops are thrown in to balance them out. When original gravities exceed 1.060 some say dryness becomes impossible to maintain and the malt begins to take control.124 http://infohost.nmt.edu/~armiller/beer/beersty1.htm

“Commercial examples:
Dragon Stout, ABC Stout, Lion Stout.
O.G.: 1.050 – 1.070; Alcohol: 5.5 – 7%; IBUs: 25 – 60; SRM: 35 +.”125http://infohost.nmt.edu/~armiller/beer/beersty1.htm

Imperial or Russian or Imperial Russian Stout – The precursor to the International Stout, it is deliberately stronger and more robust than a dry stout. Heavily hopped and starting with higher original gravity, more malt, it is higher in alcohol and more bitter, much like an IPA, these characteristics helped it export well to far away shores, like Imperial Russia. Very dark to black, full bodied with a smoky or burnt fruit flavor should be noticeable. Cocoa or coffee may also be present. One may also notice the alcohol, a rich maltiness and other subtle fruity flavors.126.

“Commercial examples:
Samuel Smiths Imperial Stout, Grants Imperial Stout, Courages Imperial Russian Stout.
O.G.: 1.075 – 1.095+; Alcohol: 7 – 9+%; IBUs: 50 – 90+; SRM: 20 – 35 +.”127

Scottish Ales

Traditionally, Scottish ales broke down into four categories based upon the old British Shilling system; 60 shilling- light; 70 shilling – heavy; 80 – 90 shilling – export; and 160 shillings – for Scotch Ales. Tavernator, in an uncharacteristic maneuver will consolidate this traditional nomenclature to two styles Scottish Ales and Scotch Ales. Both Scottish and Scotch Ales worts are carmelized through a traditional long boiling process in the wort kettle, creating a deeper amber or copper to brown color. The carmelization makes many of the malt sugars unfermentable providing greater malt aroma and flavor potency while creating a richer mouth feel. Like many of their British and Irish brethren hops tend to be limited imparting a light floral or herbal aroma and flavour allowing the malt to dominate the brew. Smoky characters may range from the dog whistle level to the straight off the grill variety.128

Scottish Ales
All of the above just not to the extremes of a Scotch Ale.

Commercial Examples:
Oskar Blues Old Chub – Scottish Style Ale, Belhaven Scottish Ale, Three Floyds’
Robert The Bruce Scottish Ale, Brooklyn Winter Ale, Odell 90 Shilling Ale, Bell’s Christmas Ale, Erie’s Railbender Ale, Belhaven’s St. Andrew’s Ale, Long Trail’s Hibernator Ale,
Orkney’s Dark Island Ale, Four Peaks Kiltlifter Scottish Style Ale, Inveralmond Blackfriar Ale,
Appalachian’s Jolly Scot Scottish Ale, Middle Ages Duke Of Winship, Breckenridge’s 471 ESB,
Orkney’s The Red MacGregor Ale, Ommegang’s Cup O Kyndnes (Cup Of Kindness), Broughtons’ Black Douglas Ale, Caledonian 80.129http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/68

Scotch Ale

Often referred to as Wee Heavy, Scotch Ales generally stronger, heavier, more full bodied and higher in alcohol content than their Scottish brethren. The maltiness, both caramel and roasted, as well as the smokiness will be more pronounced as well. They may also carry a bitterness not unlike tea. “Thistle” glasses improve the service.

Commercial Examples:
Founders Dirty Bastard, Orkneys Skull Splitter, Founders Backwoods Bastard,
Samuel Adams Scotch Ale, Belhaven’s Wee Heavy, Traquair House Ale, McEwan’s Scotch Ale, Traquair Jacobite, Moylan’s Kilt Lifter Scotch Ale, Dark Horse Scotty Karate Scotch Ale,
AleSmith Wee Heavy, Duck-Rabbit Wee Heavy Scotch Style Ale, Smuttynose Scotch Style Ale, Great Divide’s Claymore Scotch Ale, Arcadia Scotch Ale, Scotch Silly Brasserie de Silly S.A., Pike’s Kilt Lifter Scotch Style Ale, Highland Tasgall Ale, Lake Louie Warped Speed Scotch Ale, Dieu Du Ciel’s Équinoxe Du Printemps.130http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/77

96. Use of a gun in self defense is not recommended here. But See Monty Python “Self defense against Fresh Fruit” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5RKTSwAVaoU http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Self_Defence_Against_Fresh_Fruit.

97. http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/19 American Barleywine http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/152

98.http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/19

99.http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/152

100. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beer_in_Belgium; http://infohost.nmt.edu/~armiller/beer/beersty1.htm

101.http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/55; http://www.netplaces.com/home-brewing/hops-putting-the-bitter-in/putting-the-bite-in-your-beer.htm

102. http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/55

103. (Beertheostorian A) Of course it is only a few miles apart, it is friggin Belgium! It is not even the whole of Belgium!

104. http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/52

105. These style ales also often have Belgian Candy sugar thrown in further increasing the fermentable substances available to turn to alcohol and create a lighter body for such a rich beer. http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/58

106.http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/58

107. Wikipedia reports that it was first developed in the 19th Century at the Westmalle monastery. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beer_in_Belgium

108. a combination of herbs and spices used as beer flavor enhancer prior to the rise of hops.

109.http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/57

110. You can add in various flavoured stouts and Porters as well, that will not be addressed directly here. Vanilla, chocolate, coffee being some of the most common flavors, there is even a fantastic Oyster Stout brewed in Ireland and served in NYC. Porter and stout today seem to be the style of beer craft brewers wish to dress up with something different. Maybe it is the heavy strong flavors that attract the experimentation.

111. Porter replaced the ancien regime of inconsistent and wide ranging varieties of Brown Ales which were the only available beer in the era and whose recipes have for the most part long disappeared from the brewing world along with the varied and small breweries which produced them. Ultimately, Porters would come perilously close to suffering the same fate as the Brown Ales of yore which they replaced in so many areas, in a slow process that started before they even reached their zenith. First Pale Ales, developed half a century later, displaced them in their homeland of England; then Pilseners, appearing in the 1840’s, shattered their dominance everywhere in the world, except Ireland; finally Premium American Pilsener’s after World War II drove them, with numerous other styles, to near extinction. As a result Porters struggled to maintain their presence and identity until the mid to late 1990’s when they too received a revitalizing jolt from the craft brew revolution.

112. The term roasted for Light, Brown, and Dark Roasted malts refers to the kiln drying process applied to malts to terminate the germination process. This can range from around 131 degrees Fahrenheit, for light or pale roasted malts to 450 degrees for Black patent malt. This should not be confused with dark roasted barley, which is unmalted barley roasted at fairly high temperatures, and is often used in a variety of dark brews being less expensive because it requires less processing. Sufficient alcohol is derived from the other malts used in these dark brews. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malt http://allaboutbeer.com/learn-beer/home-brewing/brewing-instructions/2011/03/dark-roast-please/

113. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Porter_(beer)

114. http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/101

115. Tavernator’s all time favorite offering in this area is the dearly departed Ruffian Porter produced by Mountain Valley Brew Pub, founded in 1992 by Lon Lauterio. http://www.jackcurtin.com/liquiddiet/asn/distribution.htm Like many ventures in the first and second waves of the craft brew revolution, or the history of business generally, it could never produce a consistently large enough customer base to offset the extensive capital outlay needed for the brewing operations. What made Ruffian so special was that it had the distinct chocolate notes without adding chocolate to the brew. Another favorite of the Tavernator crew is Yuengling Porter, not because it is the greatest Porter, but because it was one the few dark brews available in the nadir of the PAP era of absolute dominance, circa 1981 – 1982. Android while sitting in the JHU grad Club sipping on a Yuengling Porter said to Dr. Janet Kueblar, after she mentioned the Sam Adams was not only a revolutionary, but a brewer. Android said, “You know what America needs, a great flavourful beer and name it Sam Adams. Ideally it should be brewed in Boston and the label should read; Sam Adams ‘Brewer, Revolutionary’ to remind the US of its radical roots.” As we all know, Jim Koch was sitting in the JHU grad that night and two to three years later he was brewing sam Adams in Boston.

116. http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/159

117. http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/159

118. http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/80, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Porter_(beer): Some historians believe the high alcohol content was for preservative effect as British brewers began to want not only to supply local pubs, but also to expand their market internationally. It is clear that this style was brewed in Baltic nations as well, but the question is which came first, Baltic breweries producing Baltic Porters or and British breweries following their lead or British breweries producing and exporting Baltic Porters and Baltic brewers deciding they wanted in on the action.

119. Sounds more like a chemical fire than a brew. Despite this description they can be quite pleasant.

120. http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/80.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Porter_(beer)

121. http://infohost.nmt.edu/~armiller/beer/beersty1.htm

122. http://infohost.nmt.edu/~armiller/beer/beersty1.htm

123. http://infohost.nmt.edu/~armiller/beer/beersty1.htm

124. http://infohost.nmt.edu/~armiller/beer/beersty1.htm

125. http://infohost.nmt.edu/~armiller/beer/beersty1.htm

126. http://infohost.nmt.edu/~armiller/beer/beersty1.htm “The fruitiness is reminiscent of the burnt currants on the edge of a cake that has just been removed from the oven, or the Christmas pudding in Britain, heavy with dried and candied fruits. The alcohol suggests that the cocoa or coffee, pudding or cake, has been laced with spirit.”

127. http://infohost.nmt.edu/~armiller/beer/beersty1.htm

128. http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/68; http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/77

129. http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/68

130. http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/77

Use of a gun in self defense is not recommended here. But See Monty Python “Self defense against Fresh Fruit” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5RKTSwAVaoU http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Self_Defence_Against_Fresh_Fruit.
http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/19 American Barleywine http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/152
http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/19
http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/152
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beer_in_Belgium; http://infohost.nmt.edu/~armiller/beer/beersty1.htm
http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/55; http://www.netplaces.com/home-brewing/hops-putting-the-bitter-in/putting-the-bite-in-your-beer.htm
http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/55
(Beertheostorian A) Of course it is only a few miles apart, it is friggin Belgium! It is not even the whole of Belgium!
http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/52
These style ales also often have Belgian Candy sugar thrown in further increasing the fermentable substances available to turn to alcohol and create a lighter body for such a rich beer. http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/58
http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/58
Wikipedia reports that it was first developed in the 19th Century at the Westmalle monastery. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beer_in_Belgium
a combination of herbs and spices used as beer flavor enhancer prior to the rise of hops.
http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/57
You can add in various flavoured stouts and Porters as well, that will not be addressed directly here. Vanilla, chocolate, coffee being some of the most common flavors, there is even a fantastic Oyster Stout brewed in Ireland and served in NYC. Porter and stout today seem to be the style of beer craft brewers wish to dress up with something different. Maybe it is the heavy strong flavors that attract the experimentation.
Porter replaced the ancien regime of inconsistent and wide ranging varieties of Brown Ales which were the only available beer in the era and whose recipes have for the most part long disappeared from the brewing world along with the varied and small breweries which produced them. Ultimately, Porters would come perilously close to suffering the same fate as the Brown Ales of yore which they replaced in so many areas, in a slow process that started before they even reached their zenith. First Pale Ales, developed half a century later, displaced them in their homeland of England; then Pilseners, appearing in the 1840’s, shattered their dominance everywhere in the world, except Ireland; finally Premium American Pilsener’s after World War II drove them, with numerous other styles, to near extinction. As a result Porters struggled to maintain their presence and identity until the mid to late 1990’s when they too received a revitalizing jolt from the craft brew revolution.
The term roasted for Light, Brown, and Dark Roasted malts refers to the kiln drying process applied to malts to terminate the germination process. This can range from around 131 degrees Fahrenheit, for light or pale roasted malts to 450 degrees for Black patent malt. This should not be confused with dark roasted barley, which is unmalted barley roasted at fairly high temperatures, and is often used in a variety of dark brews being less expensive because it requires less processing. Sufficient alcohol is derived from the other malts used in these dark brews. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malt http://allaboutbeer.com/learn-beer/home-brewing/brewing-instructions/2011/03/dark-roast-please/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Porter_(beer)
http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/101
Tavernator’s all time favorite offering in this area is the dearly departed Ruffian Porter produced by Mountain Valley Brew Pub, founded in 1992 by Lon Lauterio. http://www.jackcurtin.com/liquiddiet/asn/distribution.htm Like many ventures in the first and second waves of the craft brew revolution, or the history of business generally, it could never produce a consistently large enough customer base to offset the extensive capital outlay needed for the brewing operations. What made Ruffian so special was that it had the distinct chocolate notes without adding chocolate to the brew. Another favorite of the Tavernator crew is Yuengling Porter, not because it is the greatest Porter, but because it was one the few dark brews available in the nadir of the PAP era of absolute dominance, circa 1981 – 1982. Android while sitting in the JHU grad Club sipping on a Yuengling Porter said to Dr. Janet Kueblar, after she mentioned the Sam Adams was not only a revolutionary, but a brewer. Android said, “You know what America needs, a great flavourful beer and name it Sam Adams. Ideally it should be brewed in Boston and the label should read; Sam Adams ‘Brewer, Revolutionary’ to remind the US of its radical roots.” As we all know, Jim Koch was sitting in the JHU grad that night and two to three years later he was brewing sam Adams in Boston.
http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/159
http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/159
http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/80, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Porter_(beer): Some historians believe the high alcohol content was for preservative effect as British brewers began to want not only to supply local pubs, but also to expand their market internationally. It is clear that this style was brewed in Baltic nations as well, but the question is which came first, Baltic breweries producing Baltic Porters or and British breweries following their lead or British breweries producing and exporting Baltic Porters and Baltic brewers deciding they wanted in on the action.
Sounds more like a chemical fire than a brew. Despite this description they can be quite pleasant.
http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/80.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Porter_(beer)
http://infohost.nmt.edu/~armiller/beer/beersty1.htm
http://infohost.nmt.edu/~armiller/beer/beersty1.htm
http://infohost.nmt.edu/~armiller/beer/beersty1.htm
http://infohost.nmt.edu/~armiller/beer/beersty1.htm
http://infohost.nmt.edu/~armiller/beer/beersty1.htm
http://infohost.nmt.edu/~armiller/beer/beersty1.htm “The fruitiness is reminiscent of the burnt currants on the edge of a cake that has just been removed from the oven, or the Christmas pudding in Britain, heavy with dried and candied fruits. The alcohol suggests that the cocoa or coffee, pudding or cake, has been laced with spirit.”
http://infohost.nmt.edu/~armiller/beer/beersty1.htm
http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/68; http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/77
http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/68
http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/77