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Fall And Spring Beer Definitions

September 5th, 2011 by Android | Comments Off on Fall And Spring Beer Definitions | Filed in Uncategorized

Vernal and Autumnal Varieties.54

Altbier – A dark German ale believed to have originated in Dusseldorf. It tends to be low hopped, but still retains a fairly bitter finish. Alt is German for old which may refer to the fact that it is fermented in the old style, i.e., top or ale fermented, around 5000 years old, as opposed to the new fermenting style, lager fermented which is only about 600 years old.5556

“Commercial examples: DAB Dark, Widmer, Zum Uerige, Grolsch Autumn Amber, Broyhan Alt, Brunswiek Alt, Alaskan Amber, Sapporo Alt, [Long Trail Ale].
O.G.: 1.040 – 1.050; Alcohol: 4.5 – 5.5%; IBUs: 28 – 40; SRM: 10 – 19.”.57

American Amber/Red Ale:

AAA, this is kind of like PAP, a description by default. It refers to any American Ale fermented beer, that does not qualify as a Dark Ale or a Pale Ale because of color.58 Ranging from amber (duh) to deep red or garnet hues, they can include American quasi-Marzen/Oktoberfest offerings, that are ale fermented, rather than lager fermented in the true Oktoberfest style. The flavor is definitely directed to the malt, but because they are so undefined outside of color, hop influence can range from near non-existent to bordering on IPA strength. Most examples tend to fall in the middle “with toasted malt characters and a light fruitiness in most examples” not wishing to offend their potential drinking public by being too flamboyant.59

Budweiser American Ale, Stone Levitation Ale, Rogue’s American Amber Ale, Ithaca’s Cascazilla and Mendecino’s Red Tail Ale

Average alcohol by volume (abv) range: 4.0-7.0% .60

Bocks – A true Spring beer, they range in color from dark amber to dark brown. Lager brewed and originating out of Einbeck Germany, Bocks are notable for their high alcohol content and malty sweet character. They tend to be full bodied and lightly balanced with hops leaving little bitterness. (A plus in a world where anger and recrimination seem to dominate the terminations of such relationships)(oops wrong blog site) An urban legend abounds about the origins and production of Bocks; that they are really the beers that are left when one gets to the bottom of the barrel of another beer. PAP seems like a logical impossibility, so our best guess is that they were ascribed to have derived from Marzen/Oktoberfest, but who knows, it is an urban legend so logic does not apply. The appearance of a goat on the label is ascribed to the Bavarian accent. Bavarian’s apparently adopted bock as a beer style, but their accent transliterated the term from Einbeck to Ein Bock which means a goat.61 Following other beer experts Tavernator has divided Bocks into five different styles: Bock, American Bock, Doppelbock, Eisbock and Mai or Helles Bock. (Although Tavernator has treated Weizenbock as a summer style wheat beer, its flavor and body characteristics may make it more appropriate as a Spring or Fall offering than an American Bock.62)

Bock – Same basic color, body, and flavor characteristics of Bocks generally, it is the dog whistles that may distinguish a Bock from it adjective yoked cousins. Dog whistles come in chocolate notes.63 “By German law, bocks must be of at least 1.064 gravity.” 64
Commercial examples: Aass Bock,65 Frankenmuth Bock.
O.G.: 1.064 – 1.074; Alcohol: 6 – 7.5%; IBUs: 20 – 30; SRM: 20 – 35.

American Bock – Emanating from the German communities in Wisconsin, and then making there way around the country, American Bocks are one of the few beers that pre-dated the Craft beer revolution and managed to survive the PAP white out of the post war years with multiple brewers. American Bock maintained its survival in the American market in typical American Beer fashion of the era, by presenting itself as a smoother,66 lighter bodied,67 and lower alcohol content68 version of their European cousins.(including Maibocks, see below) These are beers your grandfather may have drank in the United States as they pre-date the craft beer revolution. (Maybe this is where the bottom of the barrel legends came from.)
Commercial examples: Augsburger Bock, Shiner Bock, Rolling Rock Bock, Yuengling Bock.
O.G.:1.045 – 1.052; Alcohol:4.5 – 5.5%; IBUs: 18 – 25; SRM: 4.5 – 12.69

Dopplebock – the”ator” of Bocks, German law requires they have a 1.072 gravity or higher. They are higher in alcohol content and thereby fuller bodied, but more flexible in flavor and color characteristics. They can range from pale to dark amber and range from the intensely malty sweet to a malty sweetness balanced by hoppy bitterness, and likely a distinct taste of alcohol.

Commercial examples: Paulaners Salvator, Ayinger Celebrator, Spaten Optimator, Tucher Bajuvator, Augustiner Maximator, EKU Kulminator, Samichlaus, Lowenbrau Triumphator, Hacker Pschorr Animator.
O.G.:1.072 – 1.120; Alcohol:7.5 – 14%; IBUs:17 – 40; SRM:12 – 35.70

Eisbock – Amber to dark Brown with little detectable bitterness. Eisbock literally translates to Ice Bock. An Eisbock is a Doppelbock that is chilled until ice is formed, and the ice is removed, thereby removing water from the brew and enhancing the alcohol concentration in the brew. Obviously the strongest type of bock, it is, suffice it to say, very alcoholic. This process increases the sweetness and warmth . . . like a brandy delivered from the collar of a St. Bernard.

Commercial examples: Kulmbacher Reichelbrau Eisbock Bayrisch Gfrorns, EKU “28”.
O.G.:1.092 – 1.116; Alcohol: 10 – 14%; IBUs: 26 – 33; SRM: 10 – 40.71

Helles Bock or Maibock – Lighter in color, body, and taste, as well as lacking the chocolate notes, Helles or Maibock’s are the mild version72 of the European Bock family. They are also described as Helles on alcohol steroids. 73

Commercial examples: Ayinger Mai Bock, Pschorr Marzenbock, Sierra Nevada Pale Bock, Wurzburger Maibock, Hacker-Pschorr Maibock, Einbecker Mai Ur-Bock, Hofbrauhaus Maibock.
O.G.: 1.064 – 1.068; Alcohol: 6%; IBUs: 20 – 35; SRM: 4.5 – 6.74

British Brown Ales

Mild Ale – Designed to reduce unrest in the rough and tumble coal mining regions of England Wales and Cornwall it is very malty, with little hop flavor or aroma deep copper to dark Brown Paler and lower in alcohol content than Porter this was literally a beer designed for manual laborers to “consume mass quantities.”75 Mild Ale generally depended upon a blend of malts to achieve all of their characteristics.
Commercial example: McMullens AK, Fullers Hock, Highgate Mild, Banks Mild.
O.G.: 1.031 – 1.037; Alcohol: 2.5 – 3.6%; IBUs: 12 – 37; SRM: 17 – 34.76

English Brown Ale – stronger than mild Ales in malt, alcohol and body, they brek out into two distinctly geographically defined sub-categories, Southern and Northern Brown Ales.

Northen Brown Ales – Northern Brown Ales are generally dryer, paler, hoppier, nuttier, fuller bodied, higher in alcohol, and more famous than their southern brethren.

Commercial examples: High Level, Newcastle Brown Ale, Samuel Smiths Nut Brown Ale, Double Maxim.
OG.:1.040 – 1.050; Alcohol:4.5 – 6.5%; IBUs:15 – 30; SRM:12 – 30.77

Southern Brown Ale – Utilizing caramel malts Southern’s are darker, sometimes even opaque, more medium bodied, sweeter, fruitier, with less hops influence, aromatically and flavor wise, and generally do not have the international cache of the Northerners.

Commercial example: Manns Brown Ale. 78

American Brown Ale – Drier, more alcoholic, and more bitter than Northern Brown Ales American Brown Ales were adapted by American Home Brewers from English Brown Ales. Now they are craft brewed.
Commercial examples: Cooper Smiths Dunraven Ale, Harts Pacific Crest Ale, Petes Wicked Ale, Brooklyn Brown, Abita Turbodog.79 O.G.: 1.040 – 1.055; Alcohol: 4.5 – 6.5%; IBUs: 25 – 60; SRM: 15 – 22.

Steam Beer or California Common Beer – Created in California around the 1890’s, it is an original American beer style. The contra-positive of American Cream Ales and Kolsch’s this is a brew using lager yeast fermenting at ale temperatures. Legend has it that when fermented, these beers produced so much carbonation that it looked like steam coming off the brewers wort. High to medium hop flavour, light amber to copper in clour, medium body wth a touch of maltiness, it is “commonly” compared to an India Pale Ale. The style only survived into the craft brew revolution through one brewer, Anchor.

Commercial examples: Anchor Steam, New England Atlantic Amber, Dampfbier.
O.G.: 1.044 – 1.055; Alcohol: 4 – 5%; IBUs: 35 – 45; SRM: 8 – 17.80

Oktoberfest/Marzen

One of the earliest lager beers to be produced, Marzen developed 200 to 300 years before the advent of industrial refrigeration.81 Pre-dating the advent of pilseners, Marzen’s immortality was solidified when it was served at the wedding of Crown Prince Ludwig, (later Ludwig I) of Bavaria, in 1810. The original Oktoberfest, which devolved into a local agricultural festival and then later became tied to German Unification(Reinheitsgebot Lebensraum) Day.82 Brewed in March, when the brewing season ended in Bavaria, some say because of the increased dangers of bacterial infection to the wort in the warmer months, others say fire hazards of brewing in Bavarian warm dry summers, they were, and generally still are, brewed with extra high alcohol content and tend to be on the dark amber side of the color divide. Marzen’s were stored in caves, often near a water source so they could more easily cut ice and provide additional cold storage for the summer lagering process. They were served in late summer or early autumn before they spoiled and became too undrinkable, but before the late September beers could be brewed, properly aged, and served.83 Modern Marzen range from pale, or Helles, to dark or Dunkel, with the American versions tending to shade to the original dark amber color. They tend to have more malty characteristics and although originally designed to store for long periods of time, they did not use a heavy hop profile in this beer even though knowledge of hops preservative characteristics seem to have been known at this beer’s inception. Instead they relied on high alcohol content. As a result of the low hop content and the relatively long storage periods, Oktoberfest/Marzen beers tend to get a little iffy after October, if they are brewed on schedule, in March. An Oktoberfest beer should be full bodied, rich in flavor with toasty hints of roasted squash or similar subtle autumn flavors,84 but have a fairly clean almost dry finish. Heavy syrupy malty bitter sweetness on the back end is an indication it is no longer fresh.

Most common ABV 5.0-6.0%65
Samuel Adams Octoberfest, Spaten Oktoberfestbier Ur-Märzen, Paulaner Oktoberfest-Märzen Ayinger Oktober Fest-Märzen, Hacker-Pschorr Oktoberfest-Märzen, Brooklyn Oktoberfest Beer Victory Festbier, Avery’s The Kaiser, Flying Dog’s Dogtoberfest, Hofbräu Oktoberfestbier Staatliches, Harpoon Octoberfest Beer, Beck’s Oktoberfest, Bell’s Octoberfest Beer,
Weihenstephaner Festbier, Leinenkugel’s Oktoberfest, Great Lakes Oktoberfest, Left Hand Oktoberfest, Saranac Octoberfest, Great Divide’s Hoss, Michelob Marzen. 85

Pale Ale

Originating out of Burton-on-Trent Pale Ale was Pilsener before their was pilsener. An “Uber-Beer” comparable to Pilsener or PAP, it was the world’s dominant beer in its hey-day and if you were serious about drinking beer in the early 1800’s you had to have had some variation of a Pale Ale. Rich hard water made it clearer and “enhanc[ed] the hop bitterness.”86 Ranging from golden to reddish amber in color with generally a good head retention mixing fruity, hoppy, earthy, buttery and malty aromas. Typically all English ingredients, if an English Pale Ale and if made elsewhere either uses English imported ingredients or local ingredients. This beer breaks down into five difficult to distinguish Tavernator categories. English Pale Ale, American Pale Ale, Bitters, British Cream Ale and India Pale Ale.

Average alcohol by volume (abv) range: 3.8-6.0%

English Pale Ale expect a balance of malt and hops with a slight emphasis on the malt, belying years of British suspicion of hops, originally a German import. The English versions also tend to have more of a buttery or creamy texture and also more aromatic. Typically all ingredients are English.

Commercial examples ; Bass Pale Ale, Fuller’s London Pride, Samuel Smith’s Old Brewery Pale Ale, Bell’s Pale Ale, Double Barrel Ale, Summit Extra Pale Ale, Black Sheep Ale (Special), Samuel Smith’s Organically Produced Ale, Abbot Ale Greene King, Samuel Adams Boston (Stock) Ale, Innis And Gunn Oak Aged Beer(tastes like a touch of scotch is added to the beer.) 87

American Pale Ale – A cleaner, hoppier, more straight forward version of English Pale Ales. What distinguishes APA’s is their variety. Some are really English, using all English ingredients except the water, others are very close using Locally grown English varieties of malt and hops and then others go with simply American style ingredients.

Alpha King Pale Ale, Sierra Nevada Pale Ale, Samuel Adams Pale Ale, Saranac Pale Ale, Brooklyn Ale / Pennant Ale ’55, Denver Pale Ale Great Divide Brewing Company. 88

Bitters, – arguably not even a Pale Ale, Bitters are served mostly on tap. Counterintuitively, bitters tend to have less hops than a classic Pale Ale. This may have to do with the fact that it was designed for keg service only, so it would get run out quicker without risk of spoilage.
Bitters themselves are broken down into three categories, Ordinary Bitters, Special Bitters and Extra Special Bitters.88. The ESB being the hoppiest of the three. That being said the key ingredient to Bitters is a “hearty smack” of hops. Usually Fuggles or Goldings.

Commercial examples: Ordinary Bitter Brakspear Ordinary Bitter, Youngs Bitter, Fullers Chiswick, Ballard Bitter.
O.G.: 1.035 – 1.038; Alcohol: 3 – 3.5%; IBUs: 20 – 25; SRM: 8 – 12.

Special Bitter – Sheffield Best Bitter, Theakstons Best, Fullers London Pride, Tom Sheimos Favourite.
O.G.: 1.038 – 1.042; Alcohol: 3.5 – 4.5%; IBUs: 25 – 30; SRM: 12 – 14.

Extra Special Bitter – Youngs Special, Adnams Extra, Red Hook ESB, Fullers ESB, Mitchells ESB, Theakstons XB, Redhook ESB. Ringwood Brewery Old Thumper
O.G.:1.042 – 1.055; Alcohol:4.5 – 5.5%; IBUs: 30 – 35; SRM: 12 – 14. 90

British Cream Ale -(This is a Tavernator only category) These are the Guinnesses of the Pale Ale categories. They tend to be very smooth and rich concoctions. Generally on the more subtle to non-existent end of the flavor spectrum they should always produce a tightly woven rich creamy head. In fact the head is what you want so if yours is served with little or no head we suggest sending back. The liquid itself also is richer, maybe even a bit buttery, maybe even more noticeable than on a standard pale ale

Boddingtons Pub Ale Boddingtons, Old Speckled Hen Greene King / Morland Brewery,
Tetley’s English Ale Carlsberg-Tetley Brewing Ltd.

India Pale Ale – The first beer upon which the sun never set, India Pale Ale was developed specifically to support the British overseas empire. Too slake the thirst of their soldiers and officers, Britain initially tried to export the very popular Pale Ale, but in the trip to India far too much of it spoiled. To combat the spoilage issue, the Brits increased the alcohol and hops content of their pale ale and then shipped it all over the world in oak casks adding preservative tannins to the mix. The result was a brew more potent in flavor and alcohol content than its predecessor. In effect IPA was one of the first beers on steroids. Attaining a near legendary reputation, IPA’s would nearly disappear with the independence of India in 1948 and growing power of PAPs.
Average alcohol by volume (abv) range: 4.0-7.0% [ ? ]

Harpoon IPA, Samuel Adams Latitude 48 IPA, Lagunitas IPA, Dogfishead 60 Minute IPA, Dogfishead 90 Minute IPA, Dogfishead 120 Minute IPA, Stone Brewing IPA, Sierra Nevada IPA. 91

Belgian Amber Ale Started by an English brewer who came to Belgium in the late 1800’s or to slake the thirst of British soldiers stationed in Belguim during World War I or both, they are designed to mimic British Pale Ales. Palm is the most commonly available brand of a Belgian Amber Ales. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beer_in_Belgium)

Vienna Lager

Nearly extinct in the city from which it derived its name, Vienna Lager would become the flagship style that helped lead the American craft brew revolution of the 1980’s -1990’s.92 It is also the beer of the “Most Interesting Man in the World.”93 Originally brewed by Anton Dreher in 1841 Brewed in a three part process involving decoction, it should have toasty elements and an amber to dark color similar to an Oktoberfest only with the sweet maltiness mellowed out and a fairly dry finish. Not as hoppy as a pilsner it would get cast to the wilderness of the beer world in the wake of the development of pilsener in Austria’s imperial hinterlands. No fruitiness or esters.94

Average alcohol by volume (abv) range: 3.5-6.5%

Samuel Adams Boston Lager, Great Lakes Eliot Ness, Dos Equis Amber Lager, Abita Amber,
Negra Modelo, Leinenkugel’s Red, Blue Point Toasted Lager, Brooklyn Lager, Trader Joe’s Vienna Style Lager.95

54. (The Editors – Who was the pompous asshole who decided to go with “Vernal and Autumnal” rather than “Spring and Fall?”)(It refers to the Equinoxes upon which these seasons are defined you redundant Philistines. – Beertheostorian A)(The Editors – He is still buying the beer these days right? No need to remind him that modern archeological evidence indicates that the philistines were the cultured cosmopolitan and educated ones compared to their sheep herding country bumkin brethren the Isrealites.)

55. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lager Altbier is Lager or cold cave, now refrigerator, aged. It is this combination of top fermenting and cold aging, along with the use of older style darker malts, that limits its fruitiness, but provides a malty bittersweet clean dry finish.

56. http://infohost.nmt.edu/~armiller/beer/beersty1.htm

57. http://infohost.nmt.edu/~armiller/beer/beersty1.htm

58. (The Editors – Do you think they prefer to be called Bi-chromatic Ales?)

59. http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/128

60.http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/128 (This wide variation in abv is typical of a beer which lacks any trace of a distinct heritage and really can’t decide which side of the color divide it belongs. – Beertheostorian A)

61. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bock

62. Its flavor and body characteristics may make it a more appropriate offering than an American Bock, any time of year.

63. preferably in A flat. “Dog Whistle” Flavors – Flavors so faint that like a dog whistle, only non-humans can taste them. Also like dogs who use their heightened senses of smell to identify and introduce themselves to other dogs by smelling each others butts, most pompous beer experts like to identify and introduce most of these flavors while shrouded in a gaseous halo of crap.

64. http://infohost.nmt.edu/~armiller/beer/beersty1.htm

65. Does not taste like shit.

66. less flavourful

67. More watery

68. Like making love in a canoe by comparison. (What is the similarity between American beer and making love in a canoe: it is fucking close to water! See Monty Python.)

69. http://infohost.nmt.edu/~armiller/beer/beersty1.htm

70. http://infohost.nmt.edu/~armiller/beer/beersty1.htm

71. http://infohost.nmt.edu/~armiller/beer/beersty1.htm

72. weak sisters of the European Bock family. They are also described as Helles on alcohol steroids.

73. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bock See also Helles description above in Summer beers

74. http://infohost.nmt.edu/~armiller/beer/beersty1.htm

75. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coneheads

76. http://infohost.nmt.edu/~armiller/beer/beersty1.htm

77. http://infohost.nmt.edu/~armiller/beer/beersty1.htm

78. http://infohost.nmt.edu/~armiller/beer/beersty1.htm

79. http://infohost.nmt.edu/~armiller/beer/beersty1.htm

80. http://infohost.nmt.edu/~armiller/beer/beersty1.htm

81. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marzen

82. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oktoberfest

83. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marzen

84. Talk about a smarmy dog whistle description there. (The Editors)

85. http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/29

86. http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/97 (Until recently, around the mid 1990’s it was still the equivalent of pilsener in England. Now England has discovered the wonders of Pilsener and other more exotic beers, and it’s market share has reduced considerably. On the other hand Pale Ale is now the pilsener of American Beer aficianados, a popular fall back position for a session beer if not the number one session beer. )

87. http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/154

88.http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/97

89. “Ordinary Bitters – Medium gold to medium copper-brown. Grain and malt tend to predominate over hop flavor and bitterness (altough there are exceptions) with enough hop aroma to balance and add interest. Light to medium body. Special Bitters – Similar to an ordinary bitter, but stronger and more robust with a more evident malt flavor and hop character. A full-bodied, robust copper colored beer with a maltier, more complex flavor than either the ordinary or special bitter.” http://infohost.nmt.edu/~armiller/beer/beersty1.htm

90. http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/97

91. http://infohost.nmt.edu/~armiller/beer/beersty1.htm

92. Samuel Adams Boston Lager I

93. Dos Equis Amber series of commercials. Likely loosely based upon the lives of the authors Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Ernst Hemingway.

94. Despite the potential fruitiness of the “Most interesting man in the world.”(The Editors)

95. http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/30

(The Editors – Who was the pompous asshole who decided to go with “Vernal and Autumnal” rather than “Spring and Fall?”)(It refers to the Equinoxes upon which these seasons are defined you redundant Philistines. – Beertheostorian A)(The Editors – He is still buying the beer these days right? No need to remind him that modern archeological evidence indicates that the philistines were the cultured cosmopolitan and educated ones compared to their sheep herding country bumkin brethren the Isrealites.)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lager Altbier is Lager or cold cave, now refrigerator, aged. It is this combination of top fermenting and cold aging, along with the use of older style darker malts, that limits its fruitiness, but provides a malty bittersweet clean dry finish.
http://infohost.nmt.edu/~armiller/beer/beersty1.htm
http://infohost.nmt.edu/~armiller/beer/beersty1.htm
(The Editors – Do you think they prefer to be called Bi-chromatic Ales?)
http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/128
http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/128 (This wide variation in abv is typical of a beer which lacks any trace of a distinct heritage and really can’t decide which side of the color divide it belongs. – Beertheostorian A)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bock
Its flavor and body characteristics may make it a more appropriate offering than an American Bock, any time of year.
preferably in A flat. “Dog Whistle” Flavors – Flavors so faint that like a dog whistle, only non-humans can taste them. Also like dogs who use their heightened senses of smell to identify and introduce themselves to other dogs by smelling each others butts, most pompous beer experts like to identify and introduce most of these flavors while shrouded in a gaseous halo of crap.
http://infohost.nmt.edu/~armiller/beer/beersty1.htm
Does not taste like shit.
less flavourful
More watery
Like making love in a canoe by comparison. (What is the similarity between American beer and making love in a canoe: it is fucking close to water! See Monty Python.)
http://infohost.nmt.edu/~armiller/beer/beersty1.htm
http://infohost.nmt.edu/~armiller/beer/beersty1.htm
http://infohost.nmt.edu/~armiller/beer/beersty1.htm
weak sisters of the European Bock family. They are also described as Helles on alcohol steroids.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bock See also Helles description above in Summer beers.
http://infohost.nmt.edu/~armiller/beer/beersty1.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coneheads
http://infohost.nmt.edu/~armiller/beer/beersty1.htm
http://infohost.nmt.edu/~armiller/beer/beersty1.htm
http://infohost.nmt.edu/~armiller/beer/beersty1.htm
http://infohost.nmt.edu/~armiller/beer/beersty1.htm
http://infohost.nmt.edu/~armiller/beer/beersty1.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marzen
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oktoberfest
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marzen
Talk about a smarmy dog whistle description there. (The Editors)
http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/29
http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/97 (Until recently, around the mid 1990’s it was still the equivalent of pilsener in England. Now England has discovered the wonders of Pilsener and other more exotic beers, and it’s market share has reduced considerably. On the other hand Pale Ale is now the pilsener of American Beer aficianados, a popular fall back position for a session beer if not the number one session beer.)
http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/154
http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/97
“Ordinary Bitters – Medium gold to medium copper-brown. Grain and malt tend to predominate over hop flavor and bitterness (altough there are exceptions) with enough hop aroma to balance and add interest. Light to medium body. Special Bitters – Similar to an ordinary bitter, but stronger and more robust with a more evident malt flavor and hop character. A full-bodied, robust copper colored beer with a maltier, more complex flavor than either the ordinary or special bitter.” http://infohost.nmt.edu/~armiller/beer/beersty1.htm
http://beeradvocate.com/beer/style/97